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Biography


The Crawling

The Crawling formed winter 2014, against the bleak concrete backdrop of Lisburn city, Northern Ireland. Influenced by Paradise Lost, Katatonia and Bolt Thrower, The Crawling use a guttural vocal to combine melancholy with weight, churning out a heavy, doom/death ensemble.

January 2015 saw the debut single “Choking On Concrete,” which put the band on the scene, followed in October 2015 by the critically acclaimed “In Light of Dark Days” 3 track EP. 

2016 was a massive year for the band; most notably performing at Inferno Metal Festival in Norway, and Bloodstock Open Air in England, UK. The festival appearances have been reinforced by successful headline shows at home, which culminated in a Main Stage slot at the highly respected Siege of Limerick festival in Southern Ireland. 

With the release of the bands debut album “Anatomy Of Loss,” seven tracks expressing desperation and defeat, The Crawling strive to spread their brand of misery across the European festival scene, alongside UK and Ireland shows.


"There is no greater sorrow than to recall in misery the time when we were happy."


Bass / Vocals: Stuart Rainey

Guitar / Vocals: Andy Clarke

Drums: Gary Beattie

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Interview at Bloodstock 2016 - 'Total Rock' podcast

Total rock caught up with the band at Bloodstock - listen to the interview and a track on their podcast! Listen here!

Cheers guys!


CD review: 'In Light of Dark Days' - Metal Temple

THE CRAWLING is a three-piece Slow Death/Doom Metal band, originating in the United Kingdom, but now located in Northern Ireland. Formed in 2014, this is the band’s debut EP release, which contains three tracks. The six-minute “The Right to Crawl” opens the EP. True to the genre description, it is a slow moving song with a doomy feeling. The vocal style varies in range from low to high, but much of it is in the upper register and I can’t help but hearing some Black Metal influence to this song as well, especially when the song picks up pace, presumably during the chorus section. The song has substantial weight as well, as if it was slowly crushing the breath out of you.

“End of the Rope” is the second track. This four-minute song has a pensive and suspenseful opening, until the main distorted guitar kicks in the door with the force of a giant from the mountains beyond. Lumbering vocals and sunken guitar notes underscore the bottomless and hopeless feeling of the song, and this is clear…