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CD review: 'In Light of Dark Days' - Metal1

Founded only in 2014, another short-publication put the Ulsterman THE CRAWLING after her single "Choking On Concrete" by: Three tracks are there become that now brings out the trio on an EP, entitled "In The Light Of Dark Days".

While the cover - all in black and white and with a sad-faced female figure - would not fall out of the frame in Doom or dark metal sector, usually associates more with the death metal band logo. The (musical) is somewhere in between: With harsh growls, distorted bass and catchy midtempo riffing ( "The Right To Crawl") of Death Metal is indeed the most represented in the music of the trio, with simple held, but atmospheric Clean guitars and However, atmospheric samples as at the beginning of slow-doomy "Catatonic" have tHE CRAWLING also gloomy and sluggish elements in their sound, and to offer more than just blunt death metal. Although the songwriting may malfunction even a bit more sophisticated and diversified, but in the here offered 20 minutes indicated at least already a quite extensible, gloomy atmosphere.

For a full-length THE CRAWLING have their style refine something to be exciting on a playing time of 40 to 60 minutes - as a first sign of life can be "In The Light Of Dark Days" but definitely see respectively be heard. Conclusion: The first fragrance brand is set.

Moritz Gr├╝tz

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CD review: 'In Light of Dark Days' - Metal Temple

THE CRAWLING is a three-piece Slow Death/Doom Metal band, originating in the United Kingdom, but now located in Northern Ireland. Formed in 2014, this is the band’s debut EP release, which contains three tracks. The six-minute “The Right to Crawl” opens the EP. True to the genre description, it is a slow moving song with a doomy feeling. The vocal style varies in range from low to high, but much of it is in the upper register and I can’t help but hearing some Black Metal influence to this song as well, especially when the song picks up pace, presumably during the chorus section. The song has substantial weight as well, as if it was slowly crushing the breath out of you.

“End of the Rope” is the second track. This four-minute song has a pensive and suspenseful opening, until the main distorted guitar kicks in the door with the force of a giant from the mountains beyond. Lumbering vocals and sunken guitar notes underscore the bottomless and hopeless feeling of the song, and this is clear…