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LIVE review: Limelight II - 03/09/2016 - Uber Rock

Dense billowing smoke and the sound of Gregorian chant fill the air, marking the arrival of The Crawling, fresh from their decimation of Bloodstock just a few short weeks earlier, before the first power chord from [Gary’s] Andy's guitar proves more than enough to rip the heads off the under-dressed smiks queuing for the nightclub next door – never mind those of us just a few feet away in the confines of the same room!


The trio’s massive trainwreck-inducing rhythms hit harder than thon so-called hurricane that was supposedly bothering Florida around the same time, and clearly demonstrates just how effectively they levelled the aforementioned New Blood stage with their absolutely titanic performance at Catton Park.

They’re so brutally tight that the only crack of light they display between their constituent parts is induced by their strobes… it’s a thoughtfully and tautly created and presented set which delivers a genuine feel of malice stalking the venue while at the same time generating that feeling of genuinely fearful excitement that metal, at its most visceral level, evokes every time it is performed.

They unveil a brand new song, 'Acid On My Skin', which possess an edifying magnetism and epitomizes a performance that is majestic in every regard.

Mark Ashby
Uber Rock

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